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book reviews in 200 words

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June 2017

Vector (Joe Rush #4) – a book review

Vector

(Joe Rush #4)

by

James Abel

32905381

“Mutation is, by definition, always a surprise.”

If you are not already scared into agoraphobia by the threat of the Zika virus, Lyme disease, and skin cancer, James Abel’s book will make you afraid to leave your house or at least make you clothe yourself from head to toe and top that off with a couple layers of bug spray.

Vector is a chilling exercise that imagines the results of a terror organization’s ability to weaponize an everyday annoyance we barely notice here in the United States. It is terrifying how easy Abel makes it seem to create, distribute and disperse such a weapon.

The book starts with Joe Rush and his partner, Eddie, travelling the Amazon. Except that Eddie is missing, Joe is being followed, his guide is less than trustworthy and a large number of malaria-stricken individuals have disappeared from their homes.

Things go terribly wrong for Joe at the same time that events are going awry quietly and steadily in the United States. A terrorist’s threat is delivered, the government is blackmailed, hard decisions are made. (Some of the most terrifying moments in the book stem from the decisions of people in power and the reasoning behind those decisions.)

“Presidents say they will not make deals with enemies, but they do. Kennedy faced down the Russians during the Cuban Missile Crisis. But behind the scenes he pulled U.S. missiles from Turkey. Nixon said he’d never talk to North Vietnam. He sent a rep there at the same time.”

When the two story lines intersect, the action comes quick and fast.

The pacing of this book is just what you want in a thriller. The science was written in a believable and easy to understand way. And the ending does not disappoint.

I will definitely be going back to read the first in the Joe Rush series, White Plague.

(A review copy of this book was provided by the publisher.)

Rating: 87/100

Buy it July 25, 2017.

Lost Boy – a book review in 200 words

Lost Boy: The True Story of Captain Hook

by Christina Henry

32828538

A plethora of books on the market now retell old fairytales. Skip all of these – read Lost Boy by Christina Henry instead!

Lost Boy is Jamie’s story. Jamie is the first boy that Peter Pan brought to his island. He is also the defacto father-figure for the other boys, but only because he is the “oldest” and realizes that they still need to eat and, occasionally, bathe. And given that their lives consist of roughhousing, battle simulations, fighting off the Many-Eyed, and ransacking the pirates’ camp, he is also the closest thing to a doctor the boys have.

Everything changes when Peter brings back a boy who is younger than usual. Charlie is only five years old, and takes much of Jamie’s time and attention. Much of the book deals with Peter’s jealousy over Charlie and Jamie’s relationship and the schemes of Peter to separate Jamie from the young boy.

The addition of Nip and Sal bring further complications, of which you will need to read yourself.

And then after many crying jags (mine) – Captain Hook.

Suffice it to say, I will never look at Peter Pan the same again. I am now and forever a Captain Hook fan.

A review copy of this book was provided by the publisher. (A huge thank you to Berkley Publishing Group!)

Rating: 95/100

Buy this book July 4th!

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo – a book review in 200 words

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

by Taylor Jenkins Reid

32620332

I ended up grabbing this Advanced Reader Copy (ARC) from work because no one else took it. I don’t read romance (usually), and the cover just screamed the word at me. To my great surprise and unending delight, Seven Husbands by Taylor Jenkins Reid, is one of the finest books I have read so far this year.

The story follows the reclusive movie star, Evelyn Hugo, as she plucks an unknown journalist out of obscurity and gives her the scoop of her career. Hugo is nearing the end of her career and, clearly, her life, and has decided to finally let the public in on her secrets. Her seven marriages act as a clever literary device, a way to discover Hugo’s relationships that range from old Hollywood marriages as the beard to gay leading man to the affair with the love of her life,

Not to be forgotten is the mystery that unfolds around the journalist, Monique Grant, as Hugo’s choice to write her story. The discovery of who Grant is started me on my first crying jag.

My second jag – ugly-crying through the entire last few chapters, but in a good way.

Go out and buy this book today!

(A review copy of this book was provided by the publisher.)

Rating: 90/100

Buy this book:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

 

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